The Crosscut Logging Saw Project

 

Introduction

As hinted yesterday I have been working on getting up to speed a One Man Crosscut Logging saw I bought on ebay. I got it for a fair price of around 30 bucks and I knew it would need a little work. I don’t have any experience in filing saws, or anything like that so I knew it would be a good learning experience.

Background

OK so I’m sure you know by now about how I am planning on clearing a lot of woods on my property by hand, and naturally a good logging saw is needed. I first came to this conclusion while at the Ben Falk PDC when I realized that I could actually cut down these trees and that I didn’t need to wait to buy an expensive chainsaw, or have to deal with all the dangers of running a chainsaw. In fact at the PDC I saw a tree cut down with a Fisker pruners. Yes, pruners. It was a 65 year old Sugar Maple tree that was about 25-30 feet tall. I realized at that moment, that anybody can do this, and that unless you were talking about just a massive tree, or one with a lot of dangerous conditions (dead, dying, loose branches, vines) it would be relatively easy, and even relatively safe.

After returning from the PDC I bought the best bow saw that I could find and the Husqvarna Multi-Purpose Forest Axe to start clearing brush and small trees. In fact I had every intention of clearing most of the small trees with that bow saw. Well after looking around online I came across crosscut (logging) saws. I have already started down the path of antiques and retooling antiques, so naturally this was the match meant to happen.

After looking around I settled on getting a Perforated Lance Toothed saw for pines, and also a Disston Champion toothed saw, for everything else. The pines and softwoods are the main trees that I would be cutting so that has been my focus. After cleaning up this saw I found out that it is a Dunlap (can’t find many of these on ebay/online).

Equipment

I knew there would be quite a few things that I would need to recondition a saw from scratch. I would need to remove any rust, joint (level) the teeth, file and shape the rakers, file the teeth and then set the teeth. To remove the rust I decided to go with building a electrolysis setup. I needed to buy a vintage crosscut gauge tool that could handle all of the various aspects of tuning the saw and I would need a set of files.

I ended up buying a handful of files (some of which still aren’t here…) and a Simonds no 342 gauge, the box with instructions! I paid a good penny for this antique, but this heirloom will be passed on for generations to come.

On To The Pictures!

I borrowed my uncle’s battery charger since I currently don’t have one, and I put the saw in an electrolysis bath of Washing Soda and water. I also put the handle’s various metal pieces in an electrolysis bath and then eventually in a vinegar solution to try and “quench” the steel.

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Looks terrible for metal right? Wrong, its removing all the rust.

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All the ingredients you need.

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Trickle chargin’ the saw.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Scrubbing off all the gunk.

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Sealing

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Adding boiled linseed oil to the saw.

I then covered the saw in boiled linseed oil to protect the metal, I realize now that I needed to put a much thinner coat on it, but that doesn’t really matter too much.

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Looks damn good if I may say so myself. It came in rusted as heck.

Jointing

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Incredible quality and looks for a tool roughly 100 years old.

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Jointing along. I actually should have gotten more aggressive with the jointing, oh well next time.

Filing

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Untouched.

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One Side.

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Both sides.

Conclusion

Sadly I don’t have any pictures of me using the saw yet, but I did try it out and man its nice. As of writing this on the 5th of November, I still need to set the teeth, but I have filed them all after a few hours of work. I think I need to go back to the shop and change a few things because according to online the rakers might still be a little long because the saw “dust” that comes out is supposed to be a bit longer. There are some good pieces that are coming out, but most of it is dust. However, I have to say it cuts very very nicely, compared to the Disston I got (hadn’t worked on it yet) it cuts like butter. In fact while I was cutting on some wood I kind of floated my hands and just let the saw do all the moving and man it was cutting without any pressure what so ever. Once I start taking down the trees, I’ll have to upload a few videos and pictures of the saw in full action.

One thought on “The Crosscut Logging Saw Project

  1. Pingback: How to fell trees using only hand tools | Freedom Louisiana | Finding Freedom Down Here in Southern Louisiana

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